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in the case of dan, hawaii, in the case of ted, alaska, and in both of their cases, the country, ahead of any kind of partisan squabbling. danny inouye lived a full and remarkable life. we will miss him dearly. he was proud of his japanese heritage, proud of his roots, proud of his service as a champion of veterans and veterans' rights. he loved our troops. it is fitting that a building at the walter reed army institute of research now bears his name. i often marveled at how hard he fought to regain his health in the face of mounting odds. he died with no regrets. aloha was his last word. hawaii misses daniel inouye, america misses him, and our thoughts are with his wife irene and his son daniel ken jr. who was a great friend of my stepson johnny heinz. and also the rest of his family at this difficult time. i yield the floor. mr. mcconnell: mr. president, are we in a quorum call? the presiding officer: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: mr. president, i rise to pay tribute to senator kay bailey hutchison who will be retiring at the end of the year. senator hutchison has been a dear friend
brian schatz, the lieutenant governor of the state of hawaii, and that letter is a resignation letter. i ask unanimous consent that the senator-designee schatz resignation letter be printed in the record. the president pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. it will be printed in the record. the vice president: the chair liz before the senate a certificate of appointment to fill a vacancy presented by the death of the late senator daniel inouye of hawaii. the certificate, the chair is advised is in a form suggested by the senate. if there is no objection, the reading of the certificate will be waived and it will be printed in full in the record. if the senator-designee will submit himself to the desk the chair will administer the oath of office. the vice president : do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that i will bear true faith and that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and t
the junior senator from hawaii, daniel akaka, as he retires from a life indicated to his -- dedicated to his community and country. when he graduated from high school and the war was ongoing, and of course people were watching hawaii very closely because they had such a huge asian population, a huge japanese and american population, so it was watched very, very closely, and for reasons that really weren't valid, but that's what we did then. so he spent, daniel akaka spent two years as a civilian worker with the united states army corps of engineers and two years of active duty in the u.s. army. what his duties were basically, as i recall having talked to dan akaka, is they were there to protect the water in honolulu. after the war, dan used the original tkpwufplt bill. years -- tkpweuplt -- g.i. bill. years later he would get his masters bill. senator akaka believed he would not have gotten his master if not for the benefits he received. he has worked to make important improvements to the 21st century g.i. bill of rights, today's bill is modeled after the work done by jim webb after the educ
. akaka: madam president? the presiding officer: the the senator from hawaii. mr. akaka: madam president, i rise to give me remarks and my aloha to the united states senate. madam president, before i begin, i want to say that my good friend, my colleague of 36 years, my brother dan inouye, hawaii's senior senator, i wish him a speedy recovery and return to the senate. mr. president, i -- i mean, madam president, i rise today to say aloha to this institution. i have been honored to be a member of the united states senate for 22 years. it has been an incredible journey that i never imagined. as a senior in high school going to kamemha school for boys, which was noted as a military school, my life was changed for school. when i saw japanese fighter planes attacking pearl harbor. like most men in my generation, i joined the war effort. my path was forever altered. when the war ended, i believe i was suffering from ptsd. it was an act of congress that allowed me and the veterans of my generation, to build successful new kind of lives. congress passed the g.i. bill and i say with certainty tha
-year-old danny inouye saw the japanese planes over his hawaii home, on december 7, 1941, his first impulse was to help so he ran to help. he had emergency medical training and so he used that training to help bind the wounds of the americans injured in the attack on pearl harbor. his second impulse, just as strong, was to defend our country. but the america of 1941 did not want his service. in fact, it considered danny and his fellow japanese americans suspect and called them enemy aliens. and confined more than 100,000 of them to internment camps. when danny inouye tried to enlist to defend his country, his country told him you are not welcome. but danny inouye did not allow anger and resentment to overcome his love of country says something remarkable about him and about our country. when in 1943 president roosevelt allowed japanese americans to enlist in the fight against nazi germany, inouye and thousands of young men answered the call. he burned with desire to defend the nation that had told him and people of his background -- quote -- "you may not serve." a nation that still
through a bit of his life, explaining how he was in hawaii, in a foster home, orphanage, something similar to that and a bishop would come by monthly with each of the young children and say what can i do for you, young lady, young man and deap right away said i want a home. he explained how he went to live in the bishop's home raised by nuns and that went a long way to help danny appreciate and understand decency, working together in community, and it metropolitan a lot to him. and later then pearl harbor and he wanted to sign up and serve. but when he explained all this to us, he then mentioned how he stormed -- he was a very good shot, he was an excellent shot. he was a marksman. was a sharpshooter. and he recounted the first german he shot and killed in italy. and at that moment he was pretty proud of himself, very patriotic. i'm a good shot, i'm an american. i got that german. and after a while he engaged the enemy frequently and shot a few more germans and one time he was -- he stormed a tower, the machine gunner up in the tower and rushed up and because prior to that time one of the
counterparts there. just yesterday in my headquarters, the deputy chief of the pla navy was in hawaii at my headquarters receiving briefings on the future activities that our navies will do together, looking, talking to the issues at the rim of the pacific exercise which you mentioned that will happen in 2014. we have a growing ability to have a dialogue at the military level that is frank and open. and we do that through consultative talks that we do on a periodic basis. and then we build a calendar of events on the areas where we think will have the most opportunity to have success working together to we build a calendar of events, and so far we're having a very good record on meeting those objectives, and actually completing them. right now i believe, timeframe exactly but there's an exercise that we are doing and a bilateral way between the u.s. military and pacom, and the pla. so i just sent letters to my counterparts congratulate them on their promotions. and hoping that we continue to have a good an open dialogue. because in the end, you know, we have the responsibility, the pla and
. the president is going off to hawaii shortly. they maybe have two weeks left, and it's not the time to get through a complex policy issues because you will give them the short shrift. i think they should extend them for some time, whether that is when this the art expires. that gives them the more hard times when things, you know, hard deadlines when issues need to be addressed. i do think that there are these -- and i mentioned them. because we work together for so long, there are listed everywhere that i would. these are strongly agree to a bipartisan issues, raise the retirement age for medicare, reason for social security as well, and exit to longevity, take care of the cola. take care of reducing subsidies in medicare by further means testing premiums which exist today at a premium for part a. consolidate the premiums for all three of the programs. and then there is further means testing that could actually be done in social security through progressive indexing in things like that. those are things that have been talked about around town and the policy communities. you could do a bil
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8